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Announcement: The Canadian Society of Christian Philosophers Annual Meeting

The Canadian Society of Christian Philosophers (CSCP) is currently accepting submissions for the 2011 edition of its annual general meeting. The meeting will take place on Thursday June 2nd, 2011 from 9 A.M. until 6 P.M. at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. It is held at the same time as the annual general meeting of the Canadian Philosophical Association and the larger Congress of the Humanities.

The CSCP accepts papers from a broad range of perspectives. The primary purpose of the Canadian Society of Christian Philosophers is to provide a forum for discussion and exchange on topics in philosophy and religion--especially where these two disciplines meet. Like the Society of Christian Philosophers in the United States, the Canadian Society is ecumenical in composition with respect to Christian denomination, theological perspective and philosophical orientation. Participation in its meetings has, however, always been open to those who do not share its Christian commitment.

This group is designed as an outlet to raise awareness of the society and its aims. It will also serve as an informal place of discussion for the philosophical discussion of Christianity.

If you are interested in presenting a paper, please send a copy to Jason West, President of the Canadian Society of Christian Philosophers at jason.west@newman.edu. Submissions should be sent in by February 15th, 2011.

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