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The Midwest Studies in Philosophy Special Issue on the New Atheism...



...is now out. Here's the table of contents:


Varieties of Sense-Making (pages 1–10)
A. W. Moore

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12005
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Making Room for Faith: Does Science Exclude Religion? (pages 11–24)

Michael Ruse

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12007
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So What Else Is Neo? Theism and Epistemic Recalcitrance (pages 25–50)

David Shatz

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12008
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Religious Agnosticism (pages 51–67)

Gary Gutting

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12002
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How to Vanquish the Lingering Shadow of the Long-Dead God (pages 68–86)

Kenneth A. Taylor

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12009
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Limited Belief (pages 87–96)

Andrew Winer

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12011
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Epistemic Toleration and the New Atheism (pages 97–108)

Richard Fumerton

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12001
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Affective Theism and People of Faith (pages 109–128)

Jonathan L. Kvanvig

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12003
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Discreditable Origins and the Significance of Natural Theology (pages 129–141)

Gregg Ten Elshof

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12010
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New Atheism and the Scientistic Turn in the Atheism Movement (pages 142–153)

Massimo Pigliucci

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12006
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The New Atheists and the Cosmological Argument (pages 154–177)

Edward Feser

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12000
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Evidence, Theory, and Interpretation: The “New Atheism” and the Philosophy of Science (pages 178–188)

Alister E. McGrath

Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/misp.12004
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Notes on Mackie's "Evil and Omnipotence"

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1.1.1 for ourselves
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